Guide The Adventures of Lemon Drop, The Recycled Rag Doll (With Fun & Colorful Photos)

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The Adventures of Lemon Drop, The Recycled Rag Doll (With Fun Champagne and Lemon Drops: A Blueberry Springs Sweet Romance.
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Suppose for instance, Hannah Maria Smith had done something wrong in school, the schoolmistress could give the handle of the machine a turn, and it would scold her so loudly that her mother, and father, and brothers, and sisters, and uncles, and aunts, and friends, and those she didn't like would all hear her scolded. The machine can be charged on the instant by anyone scolding into it. In fact the whole value of Cole's Scolding Machine lies in its power to repeat out exceedingly loud whatever is spoken into it.

If the schoolmistress chooses she can put the scolding into verse, so that all who hear it in the forty miles around, can more easily remember it. The machine that I have before me now, was charged this morning for an aristocratic school and speaks as follows:—Silence!! Sneer at the boy's new whipping Machine. Notice To The Public If a schoolmistress chooses to live a hundred or a thousand miles away from her school, she can use the Scolding Machine by means of a Telephone attached thereto. One great advantage of the Electro-micro Scolding Machine is, that after it has been in use a short time the girls will all have been shamed into good behaviour; but the Machine will not become useless, as it can, without a farthing outlay, be turned into a Praising Machine, for it can be made to praise in a gentle voice as well as scold in a harsh one.

In fact, as said above it will repeat in exact tones, anything that is recited, preached, sung, whistled, whispered, shouted, scolded or praised into it—and any of which will be heard for forty miles around.

Cole would particularly recommend this one to the ladies, it would make a fine ornament for their own table. Final Notice Extraordinary—If the champion male scold of the world, and the champion female scold of the world, will call on Professor Cole, at the Book Arcade, Melbourne, he will give them both good wages, and find them constant employment at charging Scolding Machines.

If any wife has got the champion male scold for a husband, she will please to let me know.

I pray you tell. Hear ye the crash, the horrid crash? The Tidy Girl Who is it each day in the week may be seen, With her hair short and smooth, and her hands and face clean; In a stout cotton gown, of dark and light blue, Though old, so well mended, you'd take it for new; Her handkerchief tidily pinned o'er her neck. With a neat little cap, and an apron of check; Her shoes and her stockings all sound and all clean?

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She's never fine outside and dirty within. Go visit her cottage, though humble and poor.


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Who sweeps it so nicely, who makes all the bread, Who tends her sick mother, and works by her bed? Oh yes! She did! She Did! And Frog-gy played a tune. Our dear little daughter once went to a children's ball dressed as a fairy. She was proud of being a fairy, and looked so nice that I put together the above nursery doggerel to please her, and in honour of the event, little thinking that she would soon leave this world. It might be considered better by some to remove this page, but as children like it I venture to let it stand with this explanation. She was intelligent, industrious, affectionate and sociable, and is deeply regretted by all who knew her.

There is no death! One day they went to take a bath, And both sat on a rail; Our Vally hung his legs right down, The dog hung down his tail. This funny Dog one Christmas day, Directly after dinner, Just lean'd his sleepy head against Old Tom, our snoozing sinner. Tommy Trot, a man of law, Sold his bed and lay upon straw; Sold the straw and slept on grass, To buy his wife a looking-glass. Poor old Robinson Crusoe! The pig he eat, and Tom they beat, And Tom went roaring down the street.

Tom, he was a piper's son: He learned to play when he was young: But all the tunes that he could play Was, "Over the hills and far away; Over the hills and a great way off, And the wind will blow my topknot off.


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Tom with his pipe did play with such skill, That those who heard him could never keep still: Whenever they heard they began for to dance, Even the pigs on their hind legs would after him prance. As Dolly was milking her cow one day, Tom took out his pipe and began for to play; So Doll and the cow danced "the Cheshire round," Till the pail they broke and the milk ran on the ground. He met old Dame Trot with a basket of eggs, He used his pipe and she used her legs; She danced about till all the eggs she broke, She began for to fret, but he laughed at the joke.

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He saw a cross fellow beating an ass, Heavily laden with pots, pans, dishes and glass; He took out his pipe and played them a tune, And the jackass did kick off his load very soon. Tom met the parson on his way, Took out his pipe, began to play A merry tune that led his grace Into a very muddy place. The mayor then said he would not fail To send poor Tommy off to gaol. Tom took his pipe, began to play, And all the court soon danced away. I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was not at home; Taffy came to my house and stole a marrow-bone.

I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was not in. Taffy came to my house, and stole a silver pin. I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was in bed. I took up a poker and flung it at his head. This is the malt That lay in the house that Jack built. This is the rat, That ate the malt, That lay in the house that Jack built. This is the cat, That killed the rat, That ate the malt, That lay in the house that Jack built. This is the dog, That worried the cat, That killed the rat, That ate the malt, That lay in the house that Jack built.

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This is the cow with the crumpled horn, That tossed the dog, That worried the cat, That killed the rat, That ate the malt, That lay in the house that Jack built. This is the maiden all forlorn, That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, That tossed the dog, That worried the cat, That killed the rat, That ate the malt, That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the man all tattered and torn, That kissed the maiden all forlorn, That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, That tossed the dog, That worried the cat, That killed the rat, That ate the malt, That lay in the house that Jack built. This is the priest all shaven and shorn, That married the man all tattered and torn, That kissed the maiden all forlorn, That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, That tossed the dog, That worried the cat, That killed the rat, That ate the malt, That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cock that crowed in the morn, That awaked the priest all shaven and shorn, That married the man all tattered and torn, That kissed the maiden all forlorn, That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, That tossed the dog, That worried the cat, That killed the rat, That ate the malt, That lay in the house that Jack built.

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This is the farmer sowing his corn, That kept the cock that crowed in the morn, That awaked the priest all shaven and shorn, That married the man all tattered and torn, That kissed the maiden all forlorn, That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, That tossed the dog, That worried the cat, That killed the rat, That ate the malt, That lay in the house that Jack built. Nine little Niggers crying at his fate, One cried himself away, and then there were Eight. Eight little Niggers to travelling were given. But one kicked the bucket, and then there were Seven. Seven little Niggers playing at their tricks, One cut himself in halves, and then there were Six.

Six little Niggers playing with a hive, A bumble bee killed one, and then there were Five. Five little Niggers went in for law, One got into Chancery, and then there were Four. Four little Niggers going out to sea, A ref herring swallowed one, and then there were Three. Three little Niggers walking in the Zoo, A big bear cuddled one, and then there were Two. Two little Niggers sitting in the sun, One got frizzled up, and then there was One. One little Nigger living all alone, He got married, and then there were None. Jack the Giant Killer Once upon a time there lived in Cornwall, England, a lad whose name was Jack, and who was very brave and knowing.

At the same time there was a great Giant, twenty feet high and nine feet round, who lived in a cave, on an island near Jack's house. The Giant used to wade to the mainland and steal things to live upon, carrying five or six bullocks at once, and stringing sheep, pigs, and geese around his waist-band; and all the people ran away from him in fear, whenever they saw him coming.

Jack determined to destroy this Giant; so he got a pickaxe and shovel, and started in his boat on a dark evening; by the morning he had dug a pit deep and broad, then covering it with sticks and strewing a little mould over, to make it look like plain ground, he blew his horn so loudly that the Giant awoke, and came roaring towards Jack, calling him a villain for disturbing his rest, and declaring he would eat him for breakfast.

He had scarcely said this when he fell into the pit. Giant," says Jack, "where are you now? You shall have this for your breakfast. Just at this moment, the Giant's brother ran out roaring vengeance against Jack; but he jumped into his boat and pulled to the opposite shore, with the Giant after him, who caught poor Jack, just as he was landing, tied him down in his boat, and went in search of his provisions. During his absence, Jack contrived to cut a large hole in the bottom of the boat, and placed therein a piece of canvas.

After having stolen some oxen, the Giant returned and pushed off the boat, when, having got fairly out to sea, Jack pulled the canvas from the hole, which caused the boat to fill and quickly capsize.

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The Giant roared and bellowed as he struggled in the water, but was very soon exhausted and drowned, while Jack dexterously swam ashore. One day after this, Jack was sitting by a well fast asleep. A Giant named Blundebore, coming for water, at once saw and caught hold of him, and carried him to his castle. Jack was much frightened at seeing the heaps of bodies and bones strewed about.